Missouri Counseling Degrees & Licenses

“I’m not sure who coined this saying, but it’s definitely something we say in counselor education, and that is, we can only take our clients as far as we have gone ourselves.”

Karrie Swan, PhD, Counseling Program Director, Missouri State University

Pursuing a counseling career in the state of Missouri can be a rewarding professional choice. Persistent challenges within the state’s mental health care system will likely sustain robust demand for newly trained professionals for years to come.

The 2023 Mental Health America report noted Missouri’s overall ranking as 39th place in the United States. This ranking is generated using metrics designed to measure access to care and outcomes for youth and adults. The state’s specific scores for access to care and adult outcomes are particularly concerning, as both rankings include the state among the ten worst-performing states in the nation.

The Missouri mental health system is beset by some of the same challenges that plague other states. Some of these include a workforce shortage attributable to poor compensation and the demands of the Covid-19 pandemic era. The issue of compensation extends across job categories. For example, low insurance reimbursement rates can often disincentivize highly skilled professionals such as doctors from accepting certain forms of insurance coverage. The time-consuming nature of fulfilling the reimbursement requirements of public insurance systems such as Medicaid is also a problem. Finally, Missouri, like many states, faces a particular workforce shortage in its rural areas.

These issues had previously been compounded by Missouri’s refusal to enforce a federal law established by the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. This parity law, created by legislation passed in 2008, requires insurers to provide mental health care no differently than if patients were seeking treatment for physical health concerns. Some Missouri officials had hesitated to comply. In the years since this law was passed, Missouri observed a stark increase in substance abuse and suicide cases. Missouri has had a suicide rate persisting above the national average since 2000. Improved enforcement of the parity law could improve treatment rates for some of Missouri’s worst mental health care problems.

Missouri offers several accredited academic programs for students to pursue training in various counseling specialties. Read on to discover how to enter counseling careers in Missouri, including detailed information about academic programs and licensing information.

Featured Counseling Programs
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Southern New Hampshire University Online BA in Psychology - AddictionsProgram Website
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Ask an Expert: Karrie Swan, MEd, PhD

Dr. Karrie Swan is a licensed mental health counselor (WA), licensed professional counselor (MO), a child-centered play therapy trainer/supervisor, a child-parent relationship therapy trainer/supervisor, and a certified K-12 school counselor. 

Dr. Swan specializes in expressive modalities, including play therapy, expressive arts, transpersonal counseling, and dream work; approaches that are congruent with an Indigenous worldview as she is an enrolled tribal member. She is an experienced rural-based counselor with specific experiences in working with Native American children, teens, adults, and families on a western state reservation. 

Dr. Swan received her BS in politics, philosophy, and economics from Eastern Oregon University. She earned her MEd in counseling with a school counseling emphasis from the University of North Texas. She then went on to earn a PhD in counseling with an emphasis in clinical mental health counseling and play therapy from the University of North Texas. She has been the counseling program director at Missouri State University since spring 2022. Her published work ranges from play therapy for children on the autism spectrum to dream work with children, and child-centered play therapy.

CounselingSchools.com: What is something you wish the public understood about counseling?

Dr. Swan: I specialize in working with children and adolescents, and I’m also a parent. The biggest thing I wish the public understood relates to training. Our main accrediting body is CACREP. Within that, there are no specific standards that require students to learn how to work with children and adolescents. Since it is not required, you might have more of a focus in a school counseling program, but essentially, a lot of training programs may not have any training in counseling adolescents, or play therapy, sand tray therapy, or art therapy. All these are modalities that we know are best for children and adolescents. 

So when the public is out there looking for someone who can work with your child or your adolescent, you may have to dig deeper and ask questions about what their training has been in working with children. I think the public often assumes that counselors do have training in children and adolescents, but it’s not in our standard set. It’s heartbreaking that it’s not a requirement. 

Developmentally, children and adolescents are very different from adults, so of course, they process difficult experiences and their emotions very differently than an adult. My encouragement for parents who are looking for a counselor for their child is to look for specific credentials, such as a child-centered play therapist. And I say that because child-centered play therapy has the most evidence base. A credential like that is a credential that people can sometimes earn within the coursework in their program, or if their program does not offer the training, then they can earn it outside of their normal counseling master’s degree.

CounselingSchools.com: What advice would you give to aspiring students in the field of counseling?

Dr. Swan: I’m not sure who coined this saying, but it’s definitely something we say in counselor education, and that is, we can only take our clients as far as we have gone ourselves

My advice for all students who are working towards this degree or potentially thinking about what they want to do with their life is that they need to do their own work and their own counseling. It’s key to being effective in doing this work well. You have to be in a strong place on your own, and you’ve got to really understand what it’s like to be a client to understand that it’s so hard to enter this space as a stranger at first and be vulnerable and share your story. I think doing your own work is one of the most critical things that people need to do in order to be effective in the field.

Ask an Expert: Kirsten LaMantia, PhD, LPC, NCC

Dr. Kirsten LaMantia is an associate professor, counseling clinic director, and mental health counseling program coordinator for Southeast Missouri State University. She is also the chapter faculty advisor for Chi Sigma Iota. 

Dr. LaMantia has published extensively, including research on white privilege, campus diversity, and ally development through feminist pedagogy focusing on intersectionality. Courses she teaches include group counseling, social and cultural counseling, counseling skills, counseling practicum, counseling orientation and ethics, counseling theories, developmental theories, and internship-mental health.

She earned her PhD degree in counselor education and counseling from Idaho State University, an MA in community counseling from Saint Xavier University, and a BFA in acting from the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University. 

CounselingSchools.com: How are students evaluated and assessed throughout the program?

Dr. LaMantia: Students receive both formative and summative assessments throughout our program. Our faculty work hard to create supportive relationships with each student so that they are being given feedback throughout the program from someone they trust. This allows students to begin to confront personal growth so that they leave our program feeling like they have built both a solid foundation of professional counseling skills, but also growth as a human being.


CounselingSchools.com: What support systems are in place for students during their clinical training?

Dr. LaMantia: Our mental health counseling students begin their clinical experience in our on-campus counseling clinic. This allows them to see their very first clients while receiving support from the clinic director, more advanced students in our program, and other members of their cohort. They receive live supervision and constant contact with their supervisors so that when they enter their internship site placements, they are more confident with their clinical skills.

Accredited Counseling Degree Programs in Missouri

Lincoln University

Lincoln University offers a master of education degree in counseling. Students may select from one of three options: school counseling, community/agency counseling, and addiction counseling. 

The school counseling program provides graduates the training to become professional school counselors (PSCs) within Missouri. Students entering the program without a teaching certification must complete a set of courses focused on planning, implementing, and evaluating classroom guidance lessons. Students seeking certification as a PSC must pass the Missouri Content Area Assessment for Counselors.

The community/agency counseling program prepares students to become licensed professional counselors (LPCs). Upon completion of coursework, graduates must pass the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE). Students pursuing this option typically apply their skills within community-based providers.

The addictions counseling program prepares students to become certified alcohol and drug counselors (CADCs) according to the standards of the Missouri Credentialing Board. Upon graduation, students must pass the Alcohol and Drug Counselor Exam to begin practice within Missouri.

  • Location: Jefferson City, Missouri
  • Duration: Two years; school counseling is 60 credits and community/agency counseling is 70
  • Accreditation: Higher Learning Commission (HLC)

Missouri State University

The Missouri State University Counseling, Leadership and Special Education Department offers a 60-credit master of science degree in counseling. Students choose from one of two tracks: clinical mental health counseling or school counseling. Both tracks feature 48 credits of core coursework and 12 credits specific to the option. Students seeking school counselor certification who enter without a teaching degree or certificate must complete an additional nine credits of teaching coursework (three additional courses) to become certified in Missouri.

The program features a 100-hour practicum and a 600-hour internship. Students must complete a portion of their practicum hour at the Center City Counseling Clinic. Forty percent of the total internship hours must be direct client contact hours.

Near the end of their academic coursework, students must take a comprehensive exam to exit and successfully graduate. Students then must pass the National Counselor Examination (NCE) to become eligible to apply as provisionally licensed professional counselors (PLPCs). 

  • Location: Springfield, Missouri
  • Duration: 2.5 (full-time) to four (part-time) years
  • Accreditation: Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

Northwest Missouri State University

The Northwest Missouri State University School of Health Science and Wellness offers a 45-credit master of science degree in education (MSEd) in school counseling. The curriculum aligns with the tenets of the Missouri Comprehensive School Counseling Program; it provides graduates with the skills to become successful certified elementary or secondary counselors. Students entering without a BSEd must complete an additional 12 credits of coursework to be eligible to graduate.

  • Location: Maryville, Missouri
  • Duration: Two years (includes two summer terms)
  • Accreditation: Higher Learning Commission (HLC)

Southeast Missouri State University

The Southeast Missouri State University College of Education, Health and Human Studies offers a 60-credit master of arts degree in mental health counseling. To be admitted, students must possess at least nine credits of coursework in the social sciences. Graduates can become eligible for counselor licensure, national certification, and/or pursuit of further study in the university’s PhD in counselor education and supervision program.

Students seeking valuable experience and financial support while completing coursework may seek graduate assistantships. Graduate assistantships offer the benefits of cultivating relationships with faculty and administrators, gaining experience in teaching or administration, and receiving a per-year stipend.

  • Location: Cape Girardeau, Missouri
  • Duration: Two years
  • Accreditation: Higher Learning Commission (HLC), Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

University of Central Missouri

The University of Central Missouri offers a master of science degree in counseling. Three concentration options are available: a 54-credit program in either elementary school or secondary school counseling, or a 60-credit hour program in clinical mental health counseling. 

The mission of the counseling programs is to develop reflective practitioners prepared to serve society, advocate for both clients and the counseling profession, and follow the ethical standards articulated by the American Counseling Association.

The curriculum is aligned with CACREP standards and the Missouri Standards for the Preparation of Educators. Coursework focuses on topics including human growth and development, helping relationships, and social and cultural diversity. Graduation requires completing a set of core courses, specialization courses focused on intended primary service populations, and an exit exam. 

The Department of Human Services offers a master of science in human development and family science – marriage and family therapy (MFT) option. This option is the only graduate program of its kind in any of Missouri’s public universities.

  • Location: Warrensburg, Missouri
  • Duration: Two years; 54 or 60 hours
  • Accreditation: Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP); the MFT program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy (COAMFTE) and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT); UCM is the longest continuously CAEP-accredited public institution in Missouri

University of Missouri Columbia

The University of Missouri Columbia offers a fully online 60-credit master of education degree with an emphasis in school counseling. The curriculum includes a 12-credit practicum in which students receive ongoing supervision in a counseling setting. Students not already certified as teachers must take nine additional credits to fulfill state requirements. Graduates of this program are eligible for licensure in Missouri at both elementary and secondary school levels.

The curriculum is designed according to two models: a science-practitioner model of training and a comprehensive school guidance and counseling program model. Dr. Norm Gysbers, PhD, a former faculty member, is recognized as the “father” of modern school counseling and founder of the program curriculum. He has received national and international recognition as an influential scholar in the school counseling profession.

  • Location: Columbia, Missouri
  • Duration: Three years
  • Accreditation: Higher Learning Commission (HLC); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)

How Much Do Counselors Earn in Missouri?

These numbers represent data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics from May 2023—the latest data available as of April 2024.

Educational, Guidance, and Career Counselor and Advisor Salaries

United StatesMissouri
Number employed327,6601,28,770
Average annual salary (mean)$66,990$53,940
10th percentile$40,140$35,480
50th percentile (median)$61,710$49,460
90th percentile$100,050$79,400

Marriage and Family Therapist Salaries

United StatesMissouri
Number employed63,340310
Average annual salary (mean)$68,730$68,760
10th percentile$39,090$44,180
50th percentile (median)$58,510$63,580
90th percentile$104,710$95,920

Rehabilitation Counselor Salaries

United StatesMissouri
Number employed84,750520
Average annual salary (mean)$48,430$46,500
10th percentile$31,390$31,880
50th percentile (median)$44,040$43,140
90th percentile$73,710$66,480

Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors

United StatesMissouri
Number employed397,8805,790
Average annual salary (mean)$60,080$55,910
10th percentile$36,700$34,000
50th percentile (median)$53,710$48,130
90th percentile$89,920$77,470

Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors

United StatesMissouri
Number employed35,580130
Average annual salary (mean)$52,360$42,170
10th percentile$33,330$24,960
50th percentile (median)$46,130$41,440
90th percentile$79,880$58,620

Mental Health Counseling (LMHC) Licenses in Missouri: Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC)

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements
Missouri Committee for Professional Counselors

Missouri issues Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Provisional Licensed Professional Counselors (PLPC) licenses.

The requirements for PLPCs are:

  • A master’s degree in counseling, counseling and guidance, counseling psychology, clinical psychology, or school psychology. The program must be 48 semester-hours or more in length. Programs must be CACREP or CORE accredited or in line with their standards.
  • A passing score on the NCE and Missouri jurisprudence exam
  • A completed application
  • A background check
  • A completed supervision plan for the board to approve
  • A $100 application fee

To become an LPC, PLPCs must complete 3,000 hours of supervised work experience over a minimum of 24 months and a maximum of five years. Candidates must complete a minimum of 15 hours per week of direct client contact and one hour of face-to-face supervision.

Candidates with doctorates are only required to complete one year and 1,500 hours of work experience.

Licenses in Missouri are renewed every two years.

Counselors are required to submit 40 continuing education hours to renew, of which half the hours must be in a professional setting such as seminars or workshops. There is also a $50 renewal fee.

School Counseling Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)

The Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) certifies Student Services School Counselors. The requirements for the Initial Student Services Certificate (ISS) are:

  • Complete a master’s from a DESE approved student services program
  • Pass the Missouri Content Assessments Counselor exam
  • Have a recommendation for certification from the designated official at the college or university where the program was completed
  • Submit a complete application
  • Obtain a fingerprint background clearance
  • Pay the application fee

To upgrade to a Career Student Services Certificate, candidates must:

  • Complete four years of work experience
  • Complete 40 hours of professional development
  • Participate in the two-year district mentoring program
  • Participate in the employing school’s annual Performance-Based Student Services Evaluation process

Initial certificates for school counselors in Missouri are valid for four years. During those four years, school counselors are expected to meet the requirements to upgrade to a Career Student Services Certificate. Career Student Services Certificates are valid for 99 years.

Substance Abuse Counseling Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements

The Missouri Credentialing Board (MCB)

The Missouri Credentialing Board (MCB) issues Registered Alcohol Drug Counselor – Provisional (RADC-P), Missouri Associate Alcohol Drug Counselor I (MAADC I), Missouri Associate Alcohol Drug Counselor II (MAADC II), Certified Reciprocal Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CRADC), Certified Reciprocal Advanced Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CRAADC), Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) certifications.

The RADC-P credential is valid for two years and is intended to be held while pursuing a full credential such as CRADC. Candidates must:

  • Submit a completed application
  • Pay $160 application fee
  • Have at least a bachelor’s degree
  • Complete 6,000 hours of work experience within the last ten years; only 4,000 hours are required if the applicant has a master’s degree (4,200 of the 6,000 hours, or 2,800 of 4,000 if the applicant has a master’s, must be in the counseling) performance domains
  • Complete three hours of face-to-face continuing education in ethics
  • Sign the Code of Ethical Practice and Professional Conduct
  • Complete the Family Care Safety Registry Worker Registration Form
  • Have verification of current employment in substance use disorder treatment programs or correction

Requirements for MAADC I include:

  • A high school diploma or equivalency
  • 160 hours of applicable work experience within the last ten years or an associate degree or a one-year addiction certificate program
  • Three hours of face-to-face continuing education in ethics
  • Signed Mentoring and Clinical Supervision Agreement by a MCB qualified supervisor
  • Signed Professional Development Contract by an MCB qualified supervisor
  • $110 application fee
  • Completed Family Care Safety Registry Worker Registration Form
  • Signed Code of Ethical Practice and Professional Conduct

Requirements for MAADC II include:

  • A high school diploma or equivalency
  • 160 hours of applicable work experience within the last 10 years or an associate’s degree or a one-year addiction certificate program
  • Signed Mentoring and Clinical Supervision Agreement by a MCB qualified supervisor
  • Signed Professional Development Contract by an MCB qualified supervisor
  • $110 application fee
  • Completed Family Care Safety Registry Worker Registration Form
  • A completed application
  • 2,000 hours of applicable work experience within the last ten years if applying with a high school diploma; only 1,000 hours are required if applying with an associate or a one-year addiction certificate; no hours are required if the applicant has a bachelor’s
  • 300 hours of a Supervised Practicum in the Performance Domains if applying with an associate, one-year certificate program, or a high school diploma; this is not required if the applicant has a bachelor’s degree
  • 90 hours of education (three hours in ethics, face-to-face; 20 of the hours must have been obtained in the preceding 12 months); not required for candidates with bachelor’s degrees
  • Signed Code of Ethical Practice and Professional Conduct

Requirements for the CADC include:

  • A high school diploma
  • 4,000 hours of applicable work experience within the last ten years; 3,000 hours are required if applying with an associate degree or a one-year addiction certificate; 2,000 hours are required hours if applying with a bachelor’s; and only 1,000 hours are required if applying with a master’s
  • 300 hours of a Supervised Practicum in the Performance Domains
  • Signed Competency Rating Form from MCB qualified supervisor
  • Signed Supervised Practicum Form from MCB qualified supervisor
  • 180 hours of education (six hours in ethics, face-to-face; 20 of the hours must have been obtained in the preceding 12 months)
  • Passing score on the IC&RC International ADC Examination
  • $400 application and testing fee
  • A completed application
  • Family Care Safety Registry Worker Registration Form
  • Signed Code of Ethical Practice and Professional Conduct
  • A completed and signed Counselor Employment Verification Form

CRADC applicants must meet all the same requirements at CADC, except they must have:

  • 6,000 hours of applicable work experience within the last ten years; 5,000 if applying with an associate’s or a one-year addiction certificate; 4,000 hours if applying with a bachelor’s; 2,000 hours if applying with a master’s
  • 300 hours of education in substance abuse (six hours in ethics, face-to-face; 20 of the hours must have been obtained in the preceding 12 months)

CRAADC applicants must meet all the CRADC and CADC requirements as well as:

  • Have a master’s degree
  • Complete 2,000 hours of applicable work experience within the last ten years
  • Complete 180 hours of education (six hours in ethics, face-to-face; 20 of the hours must have been obtained in the preceding 12 months)

MCB credentials expire every two years. RADC-P MAADC I do not renew, as they are intended to be stepping stones to more advanced certifications. Requirements for certifications which do renew are:

  • Submit a completed application
  • Complete 20 hours of continuing education if it is the first renewal, and 40 hours for subsequent renewals; six hours must be in ethics
  • Pay $190 fee if renewing a CADC, CRADC, CRAADC, or $95 if renewing the MAADC II

Rehabilitation Counseling Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements

Missouri Committee for Professional Counselors

Rehabilitation counselors in Missouri must be either Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Provisional Licensed Professional Counselors (PLPC).

The requirements for PLPCs are:

  • A master’s degree in counseling, counseling and guidance, counseling psychology, clinical psychology, or school psychology. The program must be 48 semester hours or more in length. Programs must be CACREP or CORE accredited or in line with their standards.
  • A passing score on the NCE and Missouri jurisprudence exam
  • A completed application
  • A background check
  • A completed supervision plan for the board to approve
  • A $100 application fee

To become an LPC, PLPCs must complete 3,000 hours of supervised work experience over a minimum of 24 months and a maximum of five years. Candidates must complete a minimum of 15 hours per week of direct client contact and one hour of face-to-face supervision.

Candidates with doctorates are only required to complete one year and 1,500 hours of work experience.

Licenses in Missouri are renewed every two years.

Counselors are required to submit 40 continuing education hours to renew, of which half the hours must be in a professional setting such as seminars or workshops. There is also a $50 renewal fee.

Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements
Missouri Behavior Analyst Advisory Board

The Missouri Behavior Analyst Advisory Board issues Assistant Behavior Analyst and Behavior Analyst licenses.

Requirements for licensure are:

  • Submit a completed application
  • Pay $150 application fee
  • Hold a BCBA (for behavior analyst license) or BCaBA (for assistant license)
  • Complete a criminal background check, including fingerprinting
  • Complete two hours of continuing education in suicide prevention
  • Submit a 2×2 color photograph
  • Complete a supervision agreement (if applying as an assistant)

All Assistant Behavior Analyst or Behavior Analyst licenses issued in Missouri expire on October 31st of odd-numbered years.

To renew, analysts must:

  • Provide proof of current BCBA or BCaBA certification
  • Submit an application
  • Pay $150 renewal fee

Marriage and Family Therapy Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements
State Committee of Marital & Family Therapists

The Missouri State Committee of Marital and Family Therapists credentials Provisional Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (PLMFT) and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (PLMFT)

The requirements for a PLMFT license are:

  • Graduate with at least a master’s from a COAMFTE- or CACREP-accredited program or a regionally accredited marriage and family therapy program (at least 45 semester-hours or 60 quarter-hours and ll coursework must be completed in person)
  • Complete a background check
  • Pass the AMFTRB exam
  • Pay $100 application fee
  • Submit a completed application
  • Complete a verification of supervision form

LMFT license applicants must meet the provisional license requirements, as well as:

  • Complete 3,000 hours of supervised work experience in no less than two years (1,500 hours must be direct marriage and family therapy client contact hours; there must be two hours every two weeks of face-to-face supervision)

LMFT licenses in Missouri are renewed every two years.

Counselors are required to submit 40 continuing education hours to renew, of which half the hours must be in a professional setting, such as seminars or workshops. At least two hours must be in suicide assessment, referral, treatment, and management. There is also a $175 renewal fee.

Child (Pediatric) Behavioral Therapy Licenses in Missouri

Licensing AuthorityEligibility & DetailsRenewal Requirements
Missouri Committee for Professional Counselors

Child therapists in Missouri must be either Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Provisional Licensed Professional Counselors (PLPC).

The requirements for PLPCs are:

  • A master’s degree in counseling, counseling and guidance, counseling psychology, clinical psychology, or school psychology. The program must be 48 semester-hours or more in length. Programs must be CACREP or CORE accredited or in line with their standards.
  • A passing score on the NCE and Missouri jurisprudence exam
  • A completed application
  • A background check
  • A completed supervision plan for the board to approve
  • A $100 application fee

To become an LPC, PLPCs must complete 3,000 hours of supervised work experience over a minimum of 24 months and a maximum of five years. Candidates must complete a minimum of 15 hours per week of direct client contact and one hour of face-to-face supervision.

Candidates with doctorates must only complete one year and 1,500 hours of work experience.

Licenses in Missouri are renewed every two years.

Counselors must submit 40 continuing education hours to renew, of which half the hours must be in a professional setting such as seminars or workshops. There is also a $50 renewal fee.

Bernd Geels

Bernd Geels

Writer

Bernd Geels is a Berlin, Germany-based freelance writer and artist. He holds an undergraduate degree in atmospheric science and two graduate degrees. He completed his most recent graduate degree in international environmental studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in 2011. He is interested in healthcare, climate change, marine conservation, indigenous science and refugee issues. You can reach him directly at [email protected].

Vanessa Salvia

Vanessa Salvia

Writer

Vanessa Salvia is an Oregon-based freelance writer and editor with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry. As fun as rigorous studies in math and science were, Vanessa took an independent path and developed a prolific career covering lifestyle and healthcare topics for magazines and newspapers, important industries such as concrete construction and building waterproofing, and even hard science. You can get in touch at Sage Media and Marketing.

Counseling Schools & Licensure in Nearby States